ABOUT

Natani Notah Bio

 

Natani Notah is an interdisciplinary artist, poet, and graphic designer. She is an enrolled member of the Navajo Nation (Diné) and is also of Lakota and Cherokee descent. Inspired by acts of decolonization, Indigenous feminism, and Indigenous futurism, her work explores contemporary Native American identity through the lens of Diné womanhood. She Graduated From Cornell University with a BFA in fine art and a minor in Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies. She is the recipient of numerous awards including: The Charles Goodwin Sands Memorial Medal of Art, the Edith Stone and Walter King Memorial Prize, and The San Francisco Foundation’s Edwin Anthony & Adalaine Boudreaux Cadogan Scholarship. Her work has been published in As/Us: A Space for Women of the World, Yellow Medicine Review: A Journal of Indigenous Literature, Art and Thought, and is forthcoming in the second edition of Colonize This!: Young Women of Color on Today’s Feminism. She is a member of Women Warriors Work Collective. Natani is Currently an MFA Art Practice Candidate, Art Studio Instructor, and Teaching Assistant at Stanford University.

 


Artist Statement

My current art practice explores contemporary Native American identity through the lens of Diné (Navajo) womanhood. Inspired by acts of decolonization, Indigenous feminism, and Indigenous futurism, my most recent body of work dares to imagine a world where Native sensibilities are magnified. Through abstractions of form, an exaggeration of scale and the often-contentious mixture of natural and synthetic materials, my work provokes conversations about what it means today to be a colonized individual in the United States of America. Additionally, drawing upon minimal forms derived from Diné symbolism, my paintings, performances, installations, and sculptures become living bodies of resistance to assimilation. Conceptually I have supported my work by researching historical trauma and the disproportionate rates of violence against Indigenous women and girls. In turn challenging dominant colonial ideologies by inserting Native American narratives back into the mainstream. All of this results in moments where diverse theoretical threads come together to generate respect across cultural divides.